Field walking:  Looking for Lithics

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Ready, steady fieldwalk!

 

Local communities, school children and other volunteers are helping with an exciting field walking project. This archaeological survey technique helps find traces of the first people to live in our area, including, hopefully, stone tools.

The TayLP area is arguably the dominant geographical feature of the Tayside area: where the rivers Tay and Earn meet the estuary itself, and would have offered the first settlers of the Mesolithic a variety of rich resources that would have been highly attractive, but also powerful links between land and sea, along with the major terrestrial routes radiating from the Perth area: Strathtay, Strathmore and Strathearn. From earliest times these river valleys, or straths, have connected highland and lowland and put the area at the heart of Scotland’s east coast geography.

Post Glacial Shoreline

Using a study undertaken by Dundee University as a starting point we are looking at sites in relation to the Postglacial Sea Level, the shoreline of which may have been exploited by our early settlers.

Interested in joining us in the search? Check out our field-walking methodology below for more information.

 

 

Resources

Early_Settler_Project Design (DW comment)

 

 

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Related Files

The Tay Landscape Partnership Area

The Tay Landscape stretches from Newburgh on the south side of the Tay Estuary around to Perth and along the Carse to Dundee.

The project, a £2.6 million initiative is principally funded by Heritage Lottery Fund, will enable locals and visitors to reconnect with the natural, built and cultural heritage of the area.